• Jowar (Sabut)

    Jowar is a common name…

    Jowar is a common name for sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench). This tall-stem grass is composed of three main parts, including the seed coating, germ and endosperm. Jowar shares similarities to wheat, as both yield low to moderate food value. Jowar is comprised of 70 percent carbohydrates, 12 percent protein, 3 percent fat and low vitamin content, according to the Board on Science and Technology for International Development.
    Minerals :- Jowar contains significantly more nutritive mineral value than vitamin value. Minerals found in jowar include 220 mg of potassium, 368 mg of phosphorous, 21 mg of calcium, 5.7 mg of iron and 140 mg of magnesium. Additionally, jowar contains traces of zinc and over 20 micronutrients. One of the more significant trace mineral contained in jowar is copper. Copper content in jowar equals 1.8 mg, or 200 percent of the recommended daily value reported by the Linus Pauling Institute. Copper aids in cellular energy production, tissue formation, iron metabolism and antioxidant functioning.


  • Jowar Flour (Sorghum)

    Jowar is a common name…

    Jowar is a common name for sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench). This tall-stem grass is composed of three main parts, including the seed coating, germ and endosperm. Jowar shares similarities to wheat, as both yield low to moderate food value. Jowar is comprised of 70 percent carbohydrates, 12 percent protein, 3 percent fat and low vitamin content, according to the Board on Science and Technology for International Development.
    Minerals :-
    Jowar contains significantly more nutritive mineral value than vitamin value. Minerals found in jowar include 220 mg of potassium, 368 mg of phosphorous, 21 mg of calcium, 5.7 mg of iron and 140 mg of magnesium. Additionally, jowar contains traces of zinc and over 20 micronutrients. One of the more significant trace mineral contained in jowar is copper. Copper content in jowar equals 1.8 mg, or 200 percent of the recommended daily value reported by the Linus Pauling Institute. Copper aids in cellular energy production, tissue formation, iron metabolism and antioxidant functioning.